Splintered: A Short Story by Nick Wisseman

Posted by 2018  •  article

The Splintered Gate was the second short story in the Short Trips anthology Short Trips: Companions . It was written by Justin Richards . It featured Ian Chesterton and Barbara Wright . It is notable for taking place before the events of An Unearthly Child and being the only adventure in the Doctor Who franchise that takes place in this personal timeline which does not feature the First Doctor or Susan Foreman .

Ian has been vacationing in Dorset . One day it starts to rain and he heads back to his guest house. On the way, he passes a tea room and sees someone who resembles his co-worker, Barbara Wright . She is sitting with another woman and there is a package on their table .

When he reaches his guest house, Ian grabs at the gate to open it, but he gets a splinter in his hand . He removes the splinter, then forgets about it. When the rain lets up, he goes back outside and sees a fortune teller named Rosy Parks . She looks like the other woman he saw in the tea room. She offers to read his fortune, but when she sees the blood caked in his hand where the splinter cut him, she runs away.

The Splintered Gate was the second short story in the Short Trips anthology Short Trips: Companions . It was written by Justin Richards . It featured Ian Chesterton and Barbara Wright . It is notable for taking place before the events of An Unearthly Child and being the only adventure in the Doctor Who franchise that takes place in this personal timeline which does not feature the First Doctor or Susan Foreman .

Ian has been vacationing in Dorset . One day it starts to rain and he heads back to his guest house. On the way, he passes a tea room and sees someone who resembles his co-worker, Barbara Wright . She is sitting with another woman and there is a package on their table .

When he reaches his guest house, Ian grabs at the gate to open it, but he gets a splinter in his hand . He removes the splinter, then forgets about it. When the rain lets up, he goes back outside and sees a fortune teller named Rosy Parks . She looks like the other woman he saw in the tea room. She offers to read his fortune, but when she sees the blood caked in his hand where the splinter cut him, she runs away.

In a forest of mixed growth somewhere on the eastern spurs of the Carpathians, a man stood one winter night watching and listening, as though he waited for some beast of the woods to come within the range of his vision, and, later, of his rifle. But the game for whose presence he kept so keen an outlook was none that figured in the sportsman's calendar as lawful and proper for the chase; Ulrich von Gradwitz patrolled the dark forest in quest of a human enemy.

     He strayed away by himself from the watchers whom he had placed in ambush on the crest of the hill, and wandered far down the steep slopes amid the wild tangle of undergrowth, peering through the tree trunks and listening through the whistling and skirling of the wind and the restless beating of the branches for sight and sound of the marauders. If only on this wild night, in this dark, lone spot, he might come across Georg Znaeym, man to man, with none to witness - that was the wish that was uppermost in his thoughts. And as he stepped round the trunk of a huge beech he came face to face with the man he sought.

     Relief at being alive and exasperation at his captive plight brought a strange medley of pious thank-offerings and sharp curses to Ulrich's lips. Georg, who was early blinded with the blood which trickled across his eyes, stopped his struggling for a moment to listen, and then gave a short, snarling laugh.

From: Children's Literature Association Quarterly
Volume 30, Number 2, Summer 2005
pp. 194-205 | 10.1353/chq.2005.0036

Splintered Families, Enduring Connections: An Interview with Edwidge Danticat Katharine Capshaw Smith Abstract Katharine Capshaw Smith is the author of Children’s Literature of the Harlem Renaissance (2004) and teaches children’s literature and African American literature at the University of Connecticut.

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The Splintered Gate was the second short story in the Short Trips anthology Short Trips: Companions . It was written by Justin Richards . It featured Ian Chesterton and Barbara Wright . It is notable for taking place before the events of An Unearthly Child and being the only adventure in the Doctor Who franchise that takes place in this personal timeline which does not feature the First Doctor or Susan Foreman .

Ian has been vacationing in Dorset . One day it starts to rain and he heads back to his guest house. On the way, he passes a tea room and sees someone who resembles his co-worker, Barbara Wright . She is sitting with another woman and there is a package on their table .

When he reaches his guest house, Ian grabs at the gate to open it, but he gets a splinter in his hand . He removes the splinter, then forgets about it. When the rain lets up, he goes back outside and sees a fortune teller named Rosy Parks . She looks like the other woman he saw in the tea room. She offers to read his fortune, but when she sees the blood caked in his hand where the splinter cut him, she runs away.

In a forest of mixed growth somewhere on the eastern spurs of the Carpathians, a man stood one winter night watching and listening, as though he waited for some beast of the woods to come within the range of his vision, and, later, of his rifle. But the game for whose presence he kept so keen an outlook was none that figured in the sportsman's calendar as lawful and proper for the chase; Ulrich von Gradwitz patrolled the dark forest in quest of a human enemy.

     He strayed away by himself from the watchers whom he had placed in ambush on the crest of the hill, and wandered far down the steep slopes amid the wild tangle of undergrowth, peering through the tree trunks and listening through the whistling and skirling of the wind and the restless beating of the branches for sight and sound of the marauders. If only on this wild night, in this dark, lone spot, he might come across Georg Znaeym, man to man, with none to witness - that was the wish that was uppermost in his thoughts. And as he stepped round the trunk of a huge beech he came face to face with the man he sought.

     Relief at being alive and exasperation at his captive plight brought a strange medley of pious thank-offerings and sharp curses to Ulrich's lips. Georg, who was early blinded with the blood which trickled across his eyes, stopped his struggling for a moment to listen, and then gave a short, snarling laugh.


Splintered: A Short Story by Nick Wisseman | NOOK Book.

Posted by 2018  •  article

 
 

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