Leaving A Legacy | Legacyshare

Posted by 2018  •  article

During a January trip to rural Bertie County, North Carolina, I had the opportunity to meet several remarkable people. I traveled there with my Self-Help colleague, Roger Flake, to document the history of St. Luke Credit Union, founded in 1944. While there, we recorded a conversation with Mr. Charles Lee Sutton, who recounted his childhood memories of depositing his hard-earned dimes in a credit union where his parents were charter members. 

We also met Mr. Timothy Bazemore, Sr., a proud man who tells the story of learning how to wisely save and borrow from an educator who helped to form St. Luke Credit Union. These lessons set the foundation for all the financial success Mr. Bazemore has achieved in his long life. 

The result of these conversations is a short documentary   that gives a flavor of what life has been like for generations of African-American families, farmers and business owners in rural Eastern North Carolina for more than 70 years, since the time of Jim Crow.

During a January trip to rural Bertie County, North Carolina, I had the opportunity to meet several remarkable people. I traveled there with my Self-Help colleague, Roger Flake, to document the history of St. Luke Credit Union, founded in 1944. While there, we recorded a conversation with Mr. Charles Lee Sutton, who recounted his childhood memories of depositing his hard-earned dimes in a credit union where his parents were charter members. 

We also met Mr. Timothy Bazemore, Sr., a proud man who tells the story of learning how to wisely save and borrow from an educator who helped to form St. Luke Credit Union. These lessons set the foundation for all the financial success Mr. Bazemore has achieved in his long life. 

The result of these conversations is a short documentary   that gives a flavor of what life has been like for generations of African-American families, farmers and business owners in rural Eastern North Carolina for more than 70 years, since the time of Jim Crow.

Over 100 colleges and universities expressed interest in the 2004 Sharing the Legacy conference. Seventeen colleges and universities brought more than 160 faculty and students to Hunter College. Two days of master classes, panel discussions and performances addressed the challenges of preserving historically significant dance. The 2004 Conference expanded to include two fully produced gala concerts at the Kaye Playhouse at Hunter College. University and conservatory students performed masterworks of 20th century dance, learning about dance history through direct participation. Students traveled from as far as Hawaii and Grenoble, France for the event.

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During a January trip to rural Bertie County, North Carolina, I had the opportunity to meet several remarkable people. I traveled there with my Self-Help colleague, Roger Flake, to document the history of St. Luke Credit Union, founded in 1944. While there, we recorded a conversation with Mr. Charles Lee Sutton, who recounted his childhood memories of depositing his hard-earned dimes in a credit union where his parents were charter members. 

We also met Mr. Timothy Bazemore, Sr., a proud man who tells the story of learning how to wisely save and borrow from an educator who helped to form St. Luke Credit Union. These lessons set the foundation for all the financial success Mr. Bazemore has achieved in his long life. 

The result of these conversations is a short documentary   that gives a flavor of what life has been like for generations of African-American families, farmers and business owners in rural Eastern North Carolina for more than 70 years, since the time of Jim Crow.

Over 100 colleges and universities expressed interest in the 2004 Sharing the Legacy conference. Seventeen colleges and universities brought more than 160 faculty and students to Hunter College. Two days of master classes, panel discussions and performances addressed the challenges of preserving historically significant dance. The 2004 Conference expanded to include two fully produced gala concerts at the Kaye Playhouse at Hunter College. University and conservatory students performed masterworks of 20th century dance, learning about dance history through direct participation. Students traveled from as far as Hawaii and Grenoble, France for the event.

Please choose whether or not you want other users to be able to see on your profile that this library is a favorite of yours.

During a January trip to rural Bertie County, North Carolina, I had the opportunity to meet several remarkable people. I traveled there with my Self-Help colleague, Roger Flake, to document the history of St. Luke Credit Union, founded in 1944. While there, we recorded a conversation with Mr. Charles Lee Sutton, who recounted his childhood memories of depositing his hard-earned dimes in a credit union where his parents were charter members. 

We also met Mr. Timothy Bazemore, Sr., a proud man who tells the story of learning how to wisely save and borrow from an educator who helped to form St. Luke Credit Union. These lessons set the foundation for all the financial success Mr. Bazemore has achieved in his long life. 

The result of these conversations is a short documentary   that gives a flavor of what life has been like for generations of African-American families, farmers and business owners in rural Eastern North Carolina for more than 70 years, since the time of Jim Crow.

Over 100 colleges and universities expressed interest in the 2004 Sharing the Legacy conference. Seventeen colleges and universities brought more than 160 faculty and students to Hunter College. Two days of master classes, panel discussions and performances addressed the challenges of preserving historically significant dance. The 2004 Conference expanded to include two fully produced gala concerts at the Kaye Playhouse at Hunter College. University and conservatory students performed masterworks of 20th century dance, learning about dance history through direct participation. Students traveled from as far as Hawaii and Grenoble, France for the event.

During a January trip to rural Bertie County, North Carolina, I had the opportunity to meet several remarkable people. I traveled there with my Self-Help colleague, Roger Flake, to document the history of St. Luke Credit Union, founded in 1944. While there, we recorded a conversation with Mr. Charles Lee Sutton, who recounted his childhood memories of depositing his hard-earned dimes in a credit union where his parents were charter members. 

We also met Mr. Timothy Bazemore, Sr., a proud man who tells the story of learning how to wisely save and borrow from an educator who helped to form St. Luke Credit Union. These lessons set the foundation for all the financial success Mr. Bazemore has achieved in his long life. 

The result of these conversations is a short documentary   that gives a flavor of what life has been like for generations of African-American families, farmers and business owners in rural Eastern North Carolina for more than 70 years, since the time of Jim Crow.

Over 100 colleges and universities expressed interest in the 2004 Sharing the Legacy conference. Seventeen colleges and universities brought more than 160 faculty and students to Hunter College. Two days of master classes, panel discussions and performances addressed the challenges of preserving historically significant dance. The 2004 Conference expanded to include two fully produced gala concerts at the Kaye Playhouse at Hunter College. University and conservatory students performed masterworks of 20th century dance, learning about dance history through direct participation. Students traveled from as far as Hawaii and Grenoble, France for the event.

Please choose whether or not you want other users to be able to see on your profile that this library is a favorite of yours.

I must be a huge nerd, but I am excited to see a debate spurred by my comments on why purchasing a house to live in, yourself, is not a good…

I grew up in property management. Even still, I cringe at the idea of bad tenants and bad investments. I do not want to lose my ass. I made a…

My husband and I are new landlords.  We each owned townhouses before we met, married, and moved to the other side of Denver. At the time, his townhouse was underwater,…


Legacy (The Sharing Knife, 2) by Lois McMaster Bujold

Posted by 2018  •  article

 
 

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