Choral Hymns (4 groups) from the… | Details | AllMusic

Posted by 2018  •  article

This CD was no doubt produced in part due to the efforts of Holst's daughter, Imogen, however she did not live to see it released. It is a shame, because the set of recordings on this disc are truly some of the few gems out there in a market saturated by recordings (though some quite good) of The Planets . Sir David Willcocks conducts the RCM Chamber Choir and RPO in a survey of obscure works by Holst composed during the early 1910s, led by the wonderful piece Hymn to Dionysus (1913).

The first group offers us the first (and only) taste of the power of the full choir on this CD. The problems with balance are not apparent in the "Battle Hymn" yet the sublime nature of the quieter moments such as in "To the Unknown God" are still well executed. The orchestra also does very well in setting the proper mood with the descending bass ostinato: first menacing then growing with power and darker in mood. When the choir emerges from this tormented ostinato with a subito piano "Who is He?" it is particularly striking.

I believe the third group of the Choral Hymns of the Rig Veda to be some of the most beautiful pieces for female choir ever written. They are exquisitely performed on this CD, with Osian Ellis on harp and the female choir using the right voice; it's not too heavy with vibrato or too weak and airy. The fourth group for male choir is magical, with the "Hymn to Manas" being the standout of the two featured. The CD ends with the upbeat Two Eastern Pictures for female choir and harp.

The Rigveda ( Sanskrit : ऋग्वेद ṛgveda , from ṛc "praise, shine" [1] and veda "knowledge") is an ancient Indian collection of Vedic Sanskrit hymns . It is one of the four canonical sacred texts ( śruti ) of Hinduism known as the Vedas . [2] [3] The text is a collection of 1,028 hymns and 10,600 verses, organized into ten books ( Mandalas ). [4] A good deal of the language is still obscure and many hymns as a consequence are unintelligible. [5] [6] [7]

The hymns are dedicated to Rigvedic deities . [4] For each deity series the hymns progress from longer to shorter ones; and the number of hymns per book increases. [2] In the eight books that were composed the earliest, the hymns predominantly discuss cosmology and praise deities. [8] [9] Books 1 and 10, which were added last, deal with philosophical or speculative [9] questions about the origin of the universe and the nature of god, [10] the virtue of dāna (charity) in society, [11] and other metaphysical issues in its hymns. [12]

Rigveda is one of the oldest extant texts in any Indo-European language . [13] Philological and linguistic evidence indicate that the Rigveda was composed in the north-western region of the Indian subcontinent , most likely between c. 1500 and 1200 BC— [14] [15] [16] though a wider approximation of c. 1700–1100 BC has also been given. [17] [18] [note 1] The initial codification of the Rigveda took place during the early Kuru kingdom (c. 1200 – c. 900 BCE).

This CD was no doubt produced in part due to the efforts of Holst's daughter, Imogen, however she did not live to see it released. It is a shame, because the set of recordings on this disc are truly some of the few gems out there in a market saturated by recordings (though some quite good) of The Planets . Sir David Willcocks conducts the RCM Chamber Choir and RPO in a survey of obscure works by Holst composed during the early 1910s, led by the wonderful piece Hymn to Dionysus (1913).

The first group offers us the first (and only) taste of the power of the full choir on this CD. The problems with balance are not apparent in the "Battle Hymn" yet the sublime nature of the quieter moments such as in "To the Unknown God" are still well executed. The orchestra also does very well in setting the proper mood with the descending bass ostinato: first menacing then growing with power and darker in mood. When the choir emerges from this tormented ostinato with a subito piano "Who is He?" it is particularly striking.

I believe the third group of the Choral Hymns of the Rig Veda to be some of the most beautiful pieces for female choir ever written. They are exquisitely performed on this CD, with Osian Ellis on harp and the female choir using the right voice; it's not too heavy with vibrato or too weak and airy. The fourth group for male choir is magical, with the "Hymn to Manas" being the standout of the two featured. The CD ends with the upbeat Two Eastern Pictures for female choir and harp.

The Rigveda ( Sanskrit : ऋग्वेद ṛgveda , from ṛc "praise, shine" [1] and veda "knowledge") is an ancient Indian collection of Vedic Sanskrit hymns . It is one of the four canonical sacred texts ( śruti ) of Hinduism known as the Vedas . [2] [3] The text is a collection of 1,028 hymns and 10,600 verses, organized into ten books ( Mandalas ). [4] A good deal of the language is still obscure and many hymns as a consequence are unintelligible. [5] [6] [7]

The hymns are dedicated to Rigvedic deities . [4] For each deity series the hymns progress from longer to shorter ones; and the number of hymns per book increases. [2] In the eight books that were composed the earliest, the hymns predominantly discuss cosmology and praise deities. [8] [9] Books 1 and 10, which were added last, deal with philosophical or speculative [9] questions about the origin of the universe and the nature of god, [10] the virtue of dāna (charity) in society, [11] and other metaphysical issues in its hymns. [12]

Rigveda is one of the oldest extant texts in any Indo-European language . [13] Philological and linguistic evidence indicate that the Rigveda was composed in the north-western region of the Indian subcontinent , most likely between c. 1500 and 1200 BC— [14] [15] [16] though a wider approximation of c. 1700–1100 BC has also been given. [17] [18] [note 1] The initial codification of the Rigveda took place during the early Kuru kingdom (c. 1200 – c. 900 BCE).

The Dhammapada ( Pāli ; Prakrit : धम्मपद Dhammapada ; [1] ) is a collection of sayings of the Buddha in verse form and one of the most widely read and best known Buddhist scriptures . [2] The original version of the Dhammapada is in the Khuddaka Nikaya , a division of the Pali Canon of Theravada Buddhism.

The Buddhist scholar and commentator Buddhaghosa explains that each saying recorded in the collection was made on a different occasion in response to a unique situation that had arisen in the life of the Buddha and his monastic community . His commentary, the Dhammapada Atthakatha , presents the details of these events and is a rich source of legend for the life and times of the Buddha. [3]

The title, "Dhammapada," is a compound term composed of dhamma and pada , each word having a number of denotations and connotations. Generally, dhamma can refer to the Buddha 's "doctrine" or an "eternal truth" or "righteousness" or all "phenomena"; [4] and, at its root, pada means "foot" and thus by extension, especially in this context, means either "path" or "verse" (cf. " prosodic foot ") or both. In Tamil language 'Padam' means subject, [5] English translations of this text's title have used various combinations of these and related words. [6] [7]

The Bangalore Men – an all-male voices ensemble- led by Jonas Olsson, voice faculty at Bangalore School of Music will present choral hymns, set by British composer Gustav Holst's (1874-1934) ‘Sanskrit’ period. Launched in 2016, the choir focuses on western classical music, from eras ranging from medieval music to contemporary. In an e-mail exchange with The Hindu MetroPlus Olsson writes about their maiden presentation of Rig Vedic hymns, their journey so far and of performing in Kerala for the first time.

We are really excited to be able to present Gustav Holst's Choral Hymns from the Rig Veda in India, for the first time! The music, written by British composer Gustav Holst between years 1908-1912, is composed in a strict Western classical tradition, but with many influences from the Indian classical music, in terms of rhythm and tonality. The texts are from Rig Veda, sings praises to Agni, Vena, Indra and so on, and has been translated from Sanskrit to English by the composer himself.

We have done a lot of music in Latin, German and other European languages, since we started our choir in the beginning of 2016, that too also mainly sacred music from the Christian tradition. Since we are an independent choir, not connected to a church, I wanted to do something different this time, and basically stumbled upon these beautiful compositions by Holst, connecting so well with our Indian heritage and tradition, and felt that this was music we wanted to introduce to the country - the country Holst had in mind when composing!

Hymn to the Dawn
Hear our hymn, O Goddess,
Rich in wealth and wisdom,
Ever young yet ancient,
True to Law Eternal.

Wak’ner of the songbirds,
Ensign of the Eternal,
Draw thou near, O Fair One
In thy radiant Chariot.

Bring to her your off’ring;
Humbly bow before her:
Raise your songs of welcome
As she comes in splendour.

This CD was no doubt produced in part due to the efforts of Holst's daughter, Imogen, however she did not live to see it released. It is a shame, because the set of recordings on this disc are truly some of the few gems out there in a market saturated by recordings (though some quite good) of The Planets . Sir David Willcocks conducts the RCM Chamber Choir and RPO in a survey of obscure works by Holst composed during the early 1910s, led by the wonderful piece Hymn to Dionysus (1913).

The first group offers us the first (and only) taste of the power of the full choir on this CD. The problems with balance are not apparent in the "Battle Hymn" yet the sublime nature of the quieter moments such as in "To the Unknown God" are still well executed. The orchestra also does very well in setting the proper mood with the descending bass ostinato: first menacing then growing with power and darker in mood. When the choir emerges from this tormented ostinato with a subito piano "Who is He?" it is particularly striking.

I believe the third group of the Choral Hymns of the Rig Veda to be some of the most beautiful pieces for female choir ever written. They are exquisitely performed on this CD, with Osian Ellis on harp and the female choir using the right voice; it's not too heavy with vibrato or too weak and airy. The fourth group for male choir is magical, with the "Hymn to Manas" being the standout of the two featured. The CD ends with the upbeat Two Eastern Pictures for female choir and harp.

The Rigveda ( Sanskrit : ऋग्वेद ṛgveda , from ṛc "praise, shine" [1] and veda "knowledge") is an ancient Indian collection of Vedic Sanskrit hymns . It is one of the four canonical sacred texts ( śruti ) of Hinduism known as the Vedas . [2] [3] The text is a collection of 1,028 hymns and 10,600 verses, organized into ten books ( Mandalas ). [4] A good deal of the language is still obscure and many hymns as a consequence are unintelligible. [5] [6] [7]

The hymns are dedicated to Rigvedic deities . [4] For each deity series the hymns progress from longer to shorter ones; and the number of hymns per book increases. [2] In the eight books that were composed the earliest, the hymns predominantly discuss cosmology and praise deities. [8] [9] Books 1 and 10, which were added last, deal with philosophical or speculative [9] questions about the origin of the universe and the nature of god, [10] the virtue of dāna (charity) in society, [11] and other metaphysical issues in its hymns. [12]

Rigveda is one of the oldest extant texts in any Indo-European language . [13] Philological and linguistic evidence indicate that the Rigveda was composed in the north-western region of the Indian subcontinent , most likely between c. 1500 and 1200 BC— [14] [15] [16] though a wider approximation of c. 1700–1100 BC has also been given. [17] [18] [note 1] The initial codification of the Rigveda took place during the early Kuru kingdom (c. 1200 – c. 900 BCE).

The Dhammapada ( Pāli ; Prakrit : धम्मपद Dhammapada ; [1] ) is a collection of sayings of the Buddha in verse form and one of the most widely read and best known Buddhist scriptures . [2] The original version of the Dhammapada is in the Khuddaka Nikaya , a division of the Pali Canon of Theravada Buddhism.

The Buddhist scholar and commentator Buddhaghosa explains that each saying recorded in the collection was made on a different occasion in response to a unique situation that had arisen in the life of the Buddha and his monastic community . His commentary, the Dhammapada Atthakatha , presents the details of these events and is a rich source of legend for the life and times of the Buddha. [3]

The title, "Dhammapada," is a compound term composed of dhamma and pada , each word having a number of denotations and connotations. Generally, dhamma can refer to the Buddha 's "doctrine" or an "eternal truth" or "righteousness" or all "phenomena"; [4] and, at its root, pada means "foot" and thus by extension, especially in this context, means either "path" or "verse" (cf. " prosodic foot ") or both. In Tamil language 'Padam' means subject, [5] English translations of this text's title have used various combinations of these and related words. [6] [7]

This CD was no doubt produced in part due to the efforts of Holst's daughter, Imogen, however she did not live to see it released. It is a shame, because the set of recordings on this disc are truly some of the few gems out there in a market saturated by recordings (though some quite good) of The Planets . Sir David Willcocks conducts the RCM Chamber Choir and RPO in a survey of obscure works by Holst composed during the early 1910s, led by the wonderful piece Hymn to Dionysus (1913).

The first group offers us the first (and only) taste of the power of the full choir on this CD. The problems with balance are not apparent in the "Battle Hymn" yet the sublime nature of the quieter moments such as in "To the Unknown God" are still well executed. The orchestra also does very well in setting the proper mood with the descending bass ostinato: first menacing then growing with power and darker in mood. When the choir emerges from this tormented ostinato with a subito piano "Who is He?" it is particularly striking.

I believe the third group of the Choral Hymns of the Rig Veda to be some of the most beautiful pieces for female choir ever written. They are exquisitely performed on this CD, with Osian Ellis on harp and the female choir using the right voice; it's not too heavy with vibrato or too weak and airy. The fourth group for male choir is magical, with the "Hymn to Manas" being the standout of the two featured. The CD ends with the upbeat Two Eastern Pictures for female choir and harp.

This CD was no doubt produced in part due to the efforts of Holst's daughter, Imogen, however she did not live to see it released. It is a shame, because the set of recordings on this disc are truly some of the few gems out there in a market saturated by recordings (though some quite good) of The Planets . Sir David Willcocks conducts the RCM Chamber Choir and RPO in a survey of obscure works by Holst composed during the early 1910s, led by the wonderful piece Hymn to Dionysus (1913).

The first group offers us the first (and only) taste of the power of the full choir on this CD. The problems with balance are not apparent in the "Battle Hymn" yet the sublime nature of the quieter moments such as in "To the Unknown God" are still well executed. The orchestra also does very well in setting the proper mood with the descending bass ostinato: first menacing then growing with power and darker in mood. When the choir emerges from this tormented ostinato with a subito piano "Who is He?" it is particularly striking.

I believe the third group of the Choral Hymns of the Rig Veda to be some of the most beautiful pieces for female choir ever written. They are exquisitely performed on this CD, with Osian Ellis on harp and the female choir using the right voice; it's not too heavy with vibrato or too weak and airy. The fourth group for male choir is magical, with the "Hymn to Manas" being the standout of the two featured. The CD ends with the upbeat Two Eastern Pictures for female choir and harp.

The Rigveda ( Sanskrit : ऋग्वेद ṛgveda , from ṛc "praise, shine" [1] and veda "knowledge") is an ancient Indian collection of Vedic Sanskrit hymns . It is one of the four canonical sacred texts ( śruti ) of Hinduism known as the Vedas . [2] [3] The text is a collection of 1,028 hymns and 10,600 verses, organized into ten books ( Mandalas ). [4] A good deal of the language is still obscure and many hymns as a consequence are unintelligible. [5] [6] [7]

The hymns are dedicated to Rigvedic deities . [4] For each deity series the hymns progress from longer to shorter ones; and the number of hymns per book increases. [2] In the eight books that were composed the earliest, the hymns predominantly discuss cosmology and praise deities. [8] [9] Books 1 and 10, which were added last, deal with philosophical or speculative [9] questions about the origin of the universe and the nature of god, [10] the virtue of dāna (charity) in society, [11] and other metaphysical issues in its hymns. [12]

Rigveda is one of the oldest extant texts in any Indo-European language . [13] Philological and linguistic evidence indicate that the Rigveda was composed in the north-western region of the Indian subcontinent , most likely between c. 1500 and 1200 BC— [14] [15] [16] though a wider approximation of c. 1700–1100 BC has also been given. [17] [18] [note 1] The initial codification of the Rigveda took place during the early Kuru kingdom (c. 1200 – c. 900 BCE).

The Dhammapada ( Pāli ; Prakrit : धम्मपद Dhammapada ; [1] ) is a collection of sayings of the Buddha in verse form and one of the most widely read and best known Buddhist scriptures . [2] The original version of the Dhammapada is in the Khuddaka Nikaya , a division of the Pali Canon of Theravada Buddhism.

The Buddhist scholar and commentator Buddhaghosa explains that each saying recorded in the collection was made on a different occasion in response to a unique situation that had arisen in the life of the Buddha and his monastic community . His commentary, the Dhammapada Atthakatha , presents the details of these events and is a rich source of legend for the life and times of the Buddha. [3]

The title, "Dhammapada," is a compound term composed of dhamma and pada , each word having a number of denotations and connotations. Generally, dhamma can refer to the Buddha 's "doctrine" or an "eternal truth" or "righteousness" or all "phenomena"; [4] and, at its root, pada means "foot" and thus by extension, especially in this context, means either "path" or "verse" (cf. " prosodic foot ") or both. In Tamil language 'Padam' means subject, [5] English translations of this text's title have used various combinations of these and related words. [6] [7]

The Bangalore Men – an all-male voices ensemble- led by Jonas Olsson, voice faculty at Bangalore School of Music will present choral hymns, set by British composer Gustav Holst's (1874-1934) ‘Sanskrit’ period. Launched in 2016, the choir focuses on western classical music, from eras ranging from medieval music to contemporary. In an e-mail exchange with The Hindu MetroPlus Olsson writes about their maiden presentation of Rig Vedic hymns, their journey so far and of performing in Kerala for the first time.

We are really excited to be able to present Gustav Holst's Choral Hymns from the Rig Veda in India, for the first time! The music, written by British composer Gustav Holst between years 1908-1912, is composed in a strict Western classical tradition, but with many influences from the Indian classical music, in terms of rhythm and tonality. The texts are from Rig Veda, sings praises to Agni, Vena, Indra and so on, and has been translated from Sanskrit to English by the composer himself.

We have done a lot of music in Latin, German and other European languages, since we started our choir in the beginning of 2016, that too also mainly sacred music from the Christian tradition. Since we are an independent choir, not connected to a church, I wanted to do something different this time, and basically stumbled upon these beautiful compositions by Holst, connecting so well with our Indian heritage and tradition, and felt that this was music we wanted to introduce to the country - the country Holst had in mind when composing!


Holst: Choral Hymns from the Rig Veda - BBC Proms 2013.

Posted by 2018  •  article

 
 

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